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  1. #13
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Dear Dee,

    I really appreciate all the feedback that you are giving me. I will certainly ask the Doctor next week about the Norvasc and see what she has to say. Maybe she might want to consider changing the hypertension medicine or at least let me know how long it will take to adjust. She is supposed to be a top notch Doctor.

    I go to UCSD Medical Center in San Diego for all my medical treatment. It’s a research and teaching hospital. They seem to have the best Doctors in my area. Another good hospital is Scripps La Jolla but I think UCSD is better. The other hospitals around here stink. Dr. Garfin, the guy who operated on me, is the Chair of the Orthopedic Department at UCSD. He is not just a book Doctor. His favorite place is the operating room and spends most of his time there. The hours he puts in are beyond belief. I don't see how he does he. He is a very hands on guy with a great sense of humor and sharp as a tack. I have his e-mail address and we still stay in touch by e-mail. We formed a special bond together. I am the only patient he ever gave his e-mail address to. You can read about him on the internet if you are interested by doing a Google search for Dr. Steven Garfin. Here is one link.

    http://www.spineuniverse.com/authorbio.php?authorID=38

    It’s funny that you ask if I was on other meds during all this time. Since it took me 3 years of research to finally find the doctor who I would let operate, I had been on Oxycontin for some time and had built up quite a resistance (tolerance)to opiates before the surgeries. This is another story in itself. After the surgeries I was in so much pain you could not believe it; (it was intolerable). They were pumping me so full of Hydromorphone (Dilaudid) that the nurses thought I was going to expire. Pain Management Doctors were in my room all the time adjusting the dose and giving me just as much as they could without killing me. Even then, I remember the pain after the surgeries as unbearable. Of course time has now faded the experience. I guess that is one of the reasons my dose of Oxycontin increased so much.

    After receiving that much Dilaudid I really built up a dependency to opiates and needed so much more Oxycontin to keep from getting sick or withdrawals symptoms after the operations. I also tried Methadone about 6 months ago for a month to see if maybe that was the way to kick the Oxy’s but I hated it. It made me sweat and feel yucky. I just went right back to the Oxycontin and figured that Chemical Detox was the way. But to answer your question, these are the only opiates I have taken as pain meds.

    People who abuse opiates and build up a tolearance need to understand that if they are ever in an accident or need surgery - the Doctors will have a hard time controlling their pain and making them comfortable. That always concerned me when I was on the Oxy. What if I was in a car accident?

    However, the way I feel is getting better little by little, so don’t get me wrong. I am averaging about 4-6 hours of sleep per night. It would be nice to get a couple hours more.

    Thanks for your writing!! I am so glad to hear that you are a professional and kicked the habit. I understand that in the past years before opiate access tightened up, quite a few nurses and Doctors were addicted to opiates. *Good for you*!!!

    Cheers!!!

    Love, Terry

  2. #14
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    sudokudee is offline Senior Member
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    Dear Terry,

    Thanks for the info on that surgeon. I think it is so amazing that he was able to actually repair the damage and alleviate your back pain, considering the extensiveness of it. I am sure you are well aware of how many people who have relatively simple back surgery still have pain and problems afterwards. Not to mention adhesions when people have multiple and/or extensive back surgeries. I have heard that there is only a 50% success rate for low back surgery. For the neck surgeries, the rate is in the 90's.

    As far as the BP meds go, I think that most calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors can cause some fatigue and tiredness initially, until you adjust. I think it took my husband a few weeks. I always like to know what's causing everything so I don't worry about it--well, more like obsess about it, really. I am sure you will be fine on the norvasc once you get used to it.

    I do think, though, that it could certainly be possible that taking both clonidine and norvasc could make you feel some additional fatigue. They both dilate blood vessels.

    We have often seen here where people will use clonidine, sedatives, and anti-anxiety meds to help with withdrawal, which they do, but then later they will be asking why they feel like they are so hungover.

    You seem to be pretty on top of this yourself, having already eliminated the AD as unnecessary. You seem well aware that some of the meds can be contributing to persistent fatigue.

    The reason I asked you about other pain medications is that some of them, like fentanyl and methadone, can prolong the withdrawal period. It does not prolong the acute, cold turkey stage, which is usually 7-10 days, but it can also cause a prolonged secondary withdrawal stage ( like withdrawal lite ). Usually involves achiness, painful legs, fatigue, no energy/motivation, sleeping difficulties.
    There can also be mood difficulties as well, but you don't sound like a mood difficulty person to me. I am not either and often don't know what advice to give to those whose biggest concern is depression during secondary withdrawal.

    I am just a "lets get rid of the aching and fatigue and I'll be fine".
    Not that I don't get mad or upset at times, but I just don't have much of a problem with chronic depression. Maybe because I'm always laughing at myself and everything else. Sometimes I'm laughing and crying at the same time.

    Maybe it has to do with not seeing yourself as a victim and realizing bad things happen to everyone. My youngest son was killed in a MVA in 05 and I think many people were disappointed that I did not display the major drama they were expecting. I kept my grief private and took it in stride. Then they thought I wasn't dealing with it correctly.
    Believe me, I was. But I am also grateful I have two other sons and also that we had a great relationship before the accident.

    So many bad things happen to so many people. What could you have possibly done to deserve what you have had to go through? You sound like a perfectly nice person who didn't deserve anything of the sort. But you are grateful for your good doctor and for your family so you are doing well.

    Whoa, wandered off track. It is possible that the methadone you took could be contributing a bit to your prolonged symptoms, also. However, since you didn't take it for long, I wouldn't think it would have a major impact. It's effects would be relative to your dose, how much you were on and how long ago you were on it.

    I was on 100 mg of methadone for a year and a half, tapering down the last 3 months. But I didn't finish the taper and jumped at 32 mg. on 9/12. I still feel pretty crappy and am sure I will continue to do so for at least several more months. This goes with the territory with methadone and buprenorphine. Fentanyl will tack on a few extra weeks, but nothing like the other two.

    I have to say that the general principles that I am familiar with oxycontin addiction and withdrawal ( I took it in rather large quantities myself, in my heyday) sort of fly out the window when it comes to

  3. #15
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Dear Dee,

    I will try to answer your questions. Regarding the methadone, I went back and looked at the calendar. I was on methadone for the month of June 2006 (30 days only) I was receiving a dose of 100 mg per day. I got withdrawal symptoms with this dose and supplemented the methadone with about another 140 mg of Oxycontin per day.(Chewed) This would keep me even keel.

    I have never had aches and pains as a withdrawal symptom during this process. I also only had a mild form of “Restless leg” for about the first 5 days. “Restless Leg” is gone. The only symptoms I have now is feeling tired (no more extreme fatigue)…just tired and a lack of energy. I am also only getting about 4-6 hours of sleep per night and need more.

    I was real good about taking my meds up until the last year. In year 7 the withdrawals would come on during the day and I started chewing Oxy to get rid of the symptoms quickly. When I would wake up every morning the withdrawals would be bad. Just to get even keel I would ingest properly 160 mg and then chew 180mg. It would then take about 30 minutes to an hour to feel better again. I would then chew 40 mg tablets throughout the day as I started to feel bad. I never did get high chewing the Oxy. As a matter of fact if I ever chewed too much and started getting high feelings I found them very discomforting. I did not like the way I would feel and it created anxiety for me. I just liked feeling normal and even keel. This was when I knew things were out of control and I needed to detox.

    The only time I took breakthrough meds was after the surgeries. They continued to give me Oxy but then they gave me bottles and bottles of 10mg Hydro for breakthrough. I spent the last year before the surgery sitting in a chair as walking created so much pain that even the oxy would not control it. If I went out I went in a wheel chair. They wanted to place a morphine pump in my back but I would not let them.(Not Garfin) I just wanted to find the right doctor who could fix me.

    None of the Doctors were ever concerned about controlling my intake. They just could not believe I was still here after my original accident, that I was walking and that I had not had pain for 26 years. They knew I was in bad shape.

    In 1972 when I was 20 years old, it was dark and I was with a girl in Santa Cruz, CA, walking on a trail that I thought I knew to the beach. I stepped off an 85’ cliff and fell flat to the beach and landed flat on my back. The paralysis below the waist was complete and immediate. I also went through what I call the three phases of dying, “nostalgia, “resistance and acceptance”, In nostalgia your whole life flashes before you, in resistance - I'm too young to go, please God not now - and the last phase - acceptance – ok lets go if it’s my time. I guess it was not my time. The accident really rocked my brain stem and I saw stars like you can’t believe. The girl I was with went and got help and I was life flighted off the beach to the hospital. It just so happens that a very famous back surgeon (don’t know his name) was visiting Santa Cruz hospital that day. They got me into the operating room, stat. I had compressed L-2 by 50% and three of the spine back bone Postthesies (sp) had broken and cut; plus pushed into my spinal cord. The spinal code was completely compressed and injected dye would not flow through the compression. Within an hour they had me opened up on the operating table and did an emergency decompression laminectomy. My spinal cord was cut and they thought that maybe I would never walk again. God put that doctor in that hospital that day for me. He has always been with me and pulled me back from the brink. I spent the next 2 years in Kasier hospitals going through a back fusion and intensive physical therapy. This was pretty hard on me being a 20 year old active male. As you know from the original post I did make a recovery and now I am on my "Final phase” which is getting off all the pain meds.

    I understand that low back surgeries are not very successful and that multiple surgeries can cau

  4. #16
    Yoshi2all is offline Member
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    Terry (and others out there),

    I am absolutely amazed that your pain during the first month can be tamed with only 600mg IBP, thats absolutely amazing considering the lack of endorphins in your body during the first month. If I was betting, I would say you won't even need 600mg IBP after three months (the time it takes to get back to your pre-addiction stage).
    I however, am not so lucky -- I take 800mg IBP a day like it's candy, making sure I eat every time I take one so it doesn't tear a hole in my stomach. I also take a crapload of otc and natural stuff to help me through. My pain is in my knee and I had it ever since I can remember, until a snowboarding accident forced me to get surgery -- that alieviated some pain, but then I went and broke my leg in a motorcycle accident. Ever since the first surgery I've been addicted to opiates and slowly working my way up as my tolerance increased. I am an addict at heart and my main addiction is adrenaline and when I couldn't get that I switched to the pills.
    My addictive personality forced me to research every pill I've ever recieved from doctors because until recently, I never had one I fully trusted. Amazingly, benzodiazapines such as valium can actually cause minor to major withdraw symptoms even after one week of constant use. Also, despite what 98% of the doctors out there think, anti-depressants are very addictive (I am so glad you were able to get off yours will no ill side effects). People get these prescibed, with doctors assuring them they don't cause PHYSICAL withdraws -- only mental. That's not too comforting when you come off cold turkey after a year plus worth of anti-depressant use and your withdraw is 2X as bad as opiate withdraw and lasts longer as well (many additionally cause electrical shock feelings that occur every five or so minutes). I have withdrawn from both opiates, benzo's, AND anti-depressants and the later was by far the worst. Paxil & Effexor are some of the worst cuprits as they are SSNRI's (seratonin and nor epinephrine reuptake inhibitors).
    Well, I kind of got off subject, but basically my point is that doctors are falable (thus your need to go to five+ surgens/diagnosis before finally finding one that works). When a doctor tells me the pain must be in my head and not really in my knee I flip on them. The only start to believe me when I tell them I refuse to take any opiates and just want some other 'cure'. Only 20 or so years ago benzo's were thought to be not physically addictive what so ever and today we know that to be quite the opposite. I just really want you to know that it may be your other meds that are/were making you feel bad after the first 10-14 day. I came off oxycontin + fentanyl patches and my withdraws lasted much longer than most of the rest of the ppl describing their withdraws. Luckily, I had a great doctor that prescribed seroquil for sleep, 100% non addictive, but one hell of a sleep aid. Plus you can take an amazingly large dose and never OD on it. If I couldn't sleep I just took more without the fear of getting hooked to normal sleep aids.
    This is the second time I've quit opiates and this time I've almost gone a full month. I don't 'crave' opiates as much as I see them as a possible end to the pain in my knee. Maybe some of you guys out there have some other ideas for pain killing other than those I've tried (and of course other than opiates). Rx or not, just not addictive. I now know I would never go back because just as you said the pills ruled my life. I remember freaking out every time a weekend fell at the end of my 30 oxy supply, and just worring I wouldn't be able to get my triplicate. They told me pain killers would be a life sentence, and I proved them wrong. I can only hope now that I can quit my effexor, but after going cold turkey due to lack of medical insurance I now know cold turkey is impossible with the dose I am on now. Being bipolar I was told my antidepressants were life long also. All I want is to be my old self again, I want to be able to think like

  5. #17
    Dave C is offline Junior Member
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    I was a police officer for for several years and was shot in the spine and have an inoperable bullet.
    I was able to walk but with great pain.
    For those who are worried I am on this board to pursue illegal drug users forget it.
    I am no longer on the force due to my injury and realize that addiction can happen to anyone, Myself included.

    Your story is inspiring.
    As I write this I am in my 6th day of detox from prescription morphine.

    Morphine Withdrawl .... Five days of hell!
    I saw this website as I was considering getting off prescription morphine.
    I was looking for answers and it seems cold turkey is the only solution.
    I am going to warn You this is rather graphic.
    I read this web page and for reasons unknown I slept till 4:00 in the afternoon the next day.
    I had been on oxycontin for one year and 30 mg of Morphine every 4 hours for 18 months.
    I was turning into a zombie.

    Every time I tried to quit my back pain for which the morphine was prescribed came back tenfold.
    Since I had slept past 3 dosages I decided it was time to attempt a cold turkey Withdrawl.

    I wouldn’t wish this on anyone.
    Day one oddly was not that hard.
    Except for increased back pain I felt weak but tolerable.
    The night of day one was different.
    I began tossing and turning and couldn’t get comfortable.
    Sleep seemed impossible.

    Day two I was weak and shakey and couldn’t get out of bed.
    My head felt like it had a steel spike driven through it.
    Hot and cold flashe’s came so rapidly I couldn’t cover up or uncover fast enough.
    I’m sorry to be Graphic but diarrhea started around 10:00 AM on the second day as well as chronic sneezing fits.
    I was totally bedridden at this point except for wobbly steps to the bathroom which were difficult.
    I fell and broke my computer once and on another trip fell and broke my DVD player.
    I didn’t care because I was beginning to think I would not live through this.
    An example of how this feels is to take every pain and injury You ever had and amplify it tenfold and all at once.

    The second night was pure hell. No sleep and the pain was tremendous.
    I had some valium that was prescribed for nerves I seldom took but I took 10 MG and finally passed out for 3 hours.
    I somehow made it.
    Day three the diarrhea became severe and I began vomiting.
    I had to keep a bucket next to my bed.
    I had not been able to eat up to this point and I staggered to the bathtub and ran a hot bath and soaked for an hour to remove the sweat.
    I also ate one slice of pizza to try and get something in my stomach but it was no use, It came up 30 minutes later.
    The hot and cold flashes came more frequently and to be honest I took my service 45 automatic out of the drawer and laid it on the bed next to me.
    Suicide seemed an acceptable option at the time.

    Day four I could not sleep and took two valium again and the hot and cold sweats turned to ice cold sweats period.
    The hot flashes were gone.
    I was still vomiting although not as frequently.
    The pain is so intense that even the slightest relief is noticeable.
    The pain began decreasing on the night of day 4 although I could not sleep well and could do nothing but toss and turn.

    I took two more valium and finally slept.
    I should mention I took a lot of ibuprofen and Pepto Bismol during this period but it had little or no effect.
    I vomited it up almost as fast as I could drink it.

    Today is day five, Going on six.
    Strangely the back pain for which this medication was prescribed is practically non exsistant.
    It is there but not nearly as serious as I remember it.
    My stomach is still slightly queasy but I have been awake for 12 hours and am able to type.
    I made dinner and held it down and my energy levels are increasing.
    I don’t feel quite normal yet but close.

    If there is one thing I’ve learned it is that I will NEVER get on an addictive pain medication again.
    Morphine has a 5-7 day withdrawl, Methadone (which they wanted to put me on) takes 6 months to withdrawl from.
    How anyone could go through that for 6 months without commiting suicide is be

  6. #18
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Josh,

    Actually, I only had a little pain the first couple of days. I don’t have any pain and have not been taking any IBP. I see my Doctor on Tuesday and I am going to research the Buspbar and the Seroquil before I see her and if I think they are beneficial as you say then I will ask to switch. I am worried about the Valium and don’t want to have to kick that also at some point. I remember during my extreme pain days I took valium along with the Oxy for a couple of months and then quit the Valium “Cold Turkey” I felt like crap for about 10 days. I am taking 2 mg of Lunesta for sleep but I hate it. If I get up after just 6 hours of sleep then it’s still in my system and I can hardly walk. I don’t walk that well any way. It takes 8 hours to leave your system. My biggest problem right now is the sleep issue.

    Today is day 34 and it’s the first morning that I have some energy. I actually feel better this morning then I have for the first time since I quit the Oxy.

    I have been eating well – two bananas every morning, tons of veggies, tons of fruit and taking lots of vitamins. It’s funny; when I was on the Oxy I craved chocolate ice cream. I ate like a quart very night and that craving is gone. I have dropped 15 pounds since I quite using.

    I wish you luck with your withdrawal struggles because I know it’s a *****! But, as I said in other posts if we have determination then we can get through it.

    Thanks for the advice on the Meds. I will look into them. It sure helps to get other peoples advice that have gone through the withdrawal process.

    Best of luck!!!!!

    Cheers!!!

  7. #19
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Dave,

    It sounds like you have been through the “Bowles of Hell” but you are making it. That’s great – keep it up! I actually had a lot of the same symptoms that you describe except the vomiting. I had diarrhea for about the first 25 days. I bought CVS drug store out of Imodium A-D and that seem to help control the problem. The diarrhea is now gone.

    Also, my vision was greatly affected. It is getting better - but I have had to wear my glasses to watch TV or drive. I understand this is normal in withdrawals and gets better as mine is. I also sneezed like crazy for about the first 29 days. Those symptoms are now gone.

    Your point on the Methadone withdrawal is interesting. Maybe since I took Methadone in June for a month that is what is prolonging my symptoms. Please be careful with the Valium. Those withdrawals can be as bad as opiates or worse if used long term. Long term usage of Benzo’s and then quitting can be very dangerous.

    That’s great that you are starting to feel better and that the pain is diminishing. Today is also my best day yet!

    Cheers!!!

    Terry

  8. #20
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Josh,

    Here is what I found on Seroquel.

    Seroquel combats the symptoms of schizophrenia, a mental disorder marked by delusions, hallucinations, disrupted thinking, and loss of contact with reality. It is the first in a new class of antipsychotic medications. Researchers believe that it works by diminishing the action of dopamine and serotonin, two of the brain's chief chemical messengers.

    It also has many, many, many side effects.

    I will stay with the Lunesta for my current sleep problems.

    Did I perhaps get the wrong drug? You spelled as Seroquil and I found it as Seroquel.

    Thanks,

    Terry

  9. #21
    thunt is offline Junior Member
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    Hi All,

    I would like to post this from the Coleman Institute regarding the phases Of Oxycontin Withdrawal.

    Phases of Withdrawal

    After working with hundreds of patients, it is clear that there are three fairly distinct phases of withdrawal:

    *

    Acute Withdrawal – This is the process most people recognize as withdrawal. It is the most severe and lasts seven to ten days. It is characterized by extreme agitation, cold chills, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal and muscle pains. It usually peaks around the fourth day and then starts resolving. In the Accelerated Detoxification Technique, the acute phase is essentially completed within the first twenty-four hours.
    *

    Sub Acute Withdrawal – This second stage is a withdrawal period that varies enormously from patient to patient. It lasts anywhere from one to eight weeks. It is the process of the brain healing and restoring its normal endorphins and neurochemicals. It is characterized essentially by fatigue during the day and insomnia at night. Initially these symptoms can be quite severe so that patients may not sleep for the first week or two, but gradually they resolve completely. Additionally there may be some mild agitation and anxiety as well as depression, mood swings and increased aches and pains.
    *

    Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome – This third phase of withdrawal can last up to one or two years. This sounds formidable, but in reality the symptoms are so mild that they’re extremely tolerable and during this phase patients feel better than they have for years so it’s really not a major problem. It is more of a situation that as patients look back they realize that by the third month they are a lot calmer, more relaxed, happier and self assured than they were one month earlier. At a year they have improved even more. Patients are more calm and relaxed as things continue to get better and better, provided they work their program.

    While I don't believe in their Acelerated Detox I find the "Three Phases of Withdrawals" interesting.

    Terry

  10. #22
    Larry567 is offline Member
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    [quote]quote:Originally posted by Dave C

    I was a police officer for for several years and was shot in the spine and have an inoperable bullet.
    I was able to walk but with great pain.
    For those who are worried I am on this board to pursue illegal drug users forget it.
    I am no longer on the force due to my injury and realize that addiction can happen to anyone, Myself included.

    Your story is inspiring.
    As I write this I am in my 6th day of detox from prescription morphine.

    Morphine Withdrawl .... Five days of hell!
    I saw this website as I was considering getting off prescription morphine.
    I was looking for answers and it seems cold turkey is the only solution.
    I am going to warn You this is rather graphic.
    I read this web page and for reasons unknown I slept till 4:00 in the afternoon the next day.
    I had been on oxycontin for one year and 30 mg of Morphine every 4 hours for 18 months.
    I was turning into a zombie.

    Every time I tried to quit my back pain for which the morphine was prescribed came back tenfold.
    Since I had slept past 3 dosages I decided it was time to attempt a cold turkey Withdrawl.

    I wouldn’t wish this on anyone.
    Day one oddly was not that hard.
    Except for increased back pain I felt weak but tolerable.
    The night of day one was different.
    I began tossing and turning and couldn’t get comfortable.
    Sleep seemed impossible.

    Day two I was weak and shakey and couldn’t get out of bed.
    My head felt like it had a steel spike driven through it.
    Hot and cold flashe’s came so rapidly I couldn’t cover up or uncover fast enough.
    I’m sorry to be Graphic but diarrhea started around 10:00 AM on the second day as well as chronic sneezing fits.
    I was totally bedridden at this point except for wobbly steps to the bathroom which were difficult.
    I fell and broke my computer once and on another trip fell and broke my DVD player.
    I didn’t care because I was beginning to think I would not live through this.
    An example of how this feels is to take every pain and injury You ever had and amplify it tenfold and all at once.

    The second night was pure hell. No sleep and the pain was tremendous.
    I had some valium that was prescribed for nerves I seldom took but I took 10 MG and finally passed out for 3 hours.
    I somehow made it.
    Day three the diarrhea became severe and I began vomiting.
    I had to keep a bucket next to my bed.
    I had not been able to eat up to this point and I staggered to the bathtub and ran a hot bath and soaked for an hour to remove the sweat.
    I also ate one slice of pizza to try and get something in my stomach but it was no use, It came up 30 minutes later.
    The hot and cold flashes came more frequently and to be honest I took my service 45 automatic out of the drawer and laid it on the bed next to me.
    Suicide seemed an acceptable option at the time.

    Day four I could not sleep and took two valium again and the hot and cold sweats turned to ice cold sweats period.
    The hot flashes were gone.
    I was still vomiting although not as frequently.
    The pain is so intense that even the slightest relief is noticeable.
    The pain began decreasing on the night of day 4 although I could not sleep well and could do nothing but toss and turn.

    I took two more valium and finally slept.
    I should mention I took a lot of ibuprofen and Pepto Bismol during this period but it had little or no effect.
    I vomited it up almost as fast as I could drink it.

    Today is day five, Going on six.
    Strangely the back pain for which this medication was prescribed is practically non exsistant.
    It is there but not nearly as serious as I remember it.
    My stomach is still slightly queasy but I have been awake for 12 hours and am able to type.
    I made dinner and held it down and my energy levels are increasing.
    I don’t feel quite normal yet but close.

    If there is one thing I’ve learned it is that I will NEVER get on an addictive pain medication again.
    Morphine has a 5-7 day wi

  11. #23
    Dave C is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Larry,
    I was taken off Oxycontin 18 months ago and switched to Morphine 30mg every 4 hours 24/7 The problem began when the dosage was no longer enough to curb the pain and occasionally I would double up just to get relief.
    I also began feeling "detached" and just going through the motions and wasn't really there or "in focus" if you know what I mean.
    The breaking point came on Sept 17 2006 when a good friend of mine I had known for 39 years(Also an ex policeman) who was having similar problems to mine shot himself unexpectedly.
    We had known each other since joining Cub Scouts in 1967 and he was on the same meds as I was. (I am 45 now).
    That drove me over the edge.
    Thankfully I have a wonderful understanding wife who stood by me during this whole process.
    I only took the valium for about 3 days during the worst part of the detox and have stopped for two days now.
    That too will be flushed down the toilet very soon so there is no risk of further addiction.
    Dave

    I should add that except on the odd occasion I would double dose I was taking them as prescribed by the doctor.
    I only took a double dose maybe 5 times in 8 months. Other than that I stuck to the prescription.
    It just got to where it didn't work anymore.


    [quote]quote:Originally posted by Larry567

    [quote]quote:Originally posted by Dave C

    I was a police officer for for several years and was shot in the spine and have an inoperable bullet.
    I was able to walk but with great pain.
    For those who are worried I am on this board to pursue illegal drug users forget it.
    I am no longer on the force due to my injury and realize that addiction can happen to anyone, Myself included.

    Your story is inspiring.
    As I write this I am in my 6th day of detox from prescription morphine.

    Morphine Withdrawl .... Five days of hell!
    I saw this website as I was considering getting off prescription morphine.
    I was looking for answers and it seems cold turkey is the only solution.
    I am going to warn You this is rather graphic.
    I read this web page and for reasons unknown I slept till 4:00 in the afternoon the next day.
    I had been on oxycontin for one year and 30 mg of Morphine every 4 hours for 18 months.
    I was turning into a zombie.

    Every time I tried to quit my back pain for which the morphine was prescribed came back tenfold.
    Since I had slept past 3 dosages I decided it was time to attempt a cold turkey Withdrawl.

    I wouldn’t wish this on anyone.
    Day one oddly was not that hard.
    Except for increased back pain I felt weak but tolerable.
    The night of day one was different.
    I began tossing and turning and couldn’t get comfortable.
    Sleep seemed impossible.

    Day two I was weak and shakey and couldn’t get out of bed.
    My head felt like it had a steel spike driven through it.
    Hot and cold flashe’s came so rapidly I couldn’t cover up or uncover fast enough.
    I’m sorry to be Graphic but diarrhea started around 10:00 AM on the second day as well as chronic sneezing fits.
    I was totally bedridden at this point except for wobbly steps to the bathroom which were difficult.
    I fell and broke my computer once and on another trip fell and broke my DVD player.
    I didn’t care because I was beginning to think I would not live through this.
    An example of how this feels is to take every pain and injury You ever had and amplify it tenfold and all at once.

    The second night was pure hell. No sleep and the pain was tremendous.
    I had some valium that was prescribed for nerves I seldom took but I took 10 MG and finally passed out for 3 hours.
    I somehow made it.
    Day three the diarrhea became severe and I began vomiting.
    I had to keep a bucket next to my bed.
    I had not been able to eat up to this point and I staggered to the bathtub and ran a hot bath and soaked for an hour to remove the sweat.
    I also ate one slice o

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