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  1. #1
    trust4me is offline Senior Member
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    Default Suboxone for chronic pain?

    Hi Everyone,

    Today I'm curious about two things...Suboxone for chronic pain? Can it be abused? Also, morphine pumps for chronic pain. Can these be abused?

    Love,
    Deb

  2. #2
    guinevere64's Avatar
    guinevere64 is offline Senior Member
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    Well, speaking as a chronic pain patient who's currently taking suboxone, I think any opioid drug "can" be abused. Personally, for me, my problem with addiction began very early in the process of daily pain medication, when I started to equate more usage with more pain relief, when that was not always true. So no matter what, I always "needed" more and at the same time had a declining concept of what the nature my physical pain was.

    If what you're asking is, can people get "high" with suboxone, I don't have any experience with that, but I'm only taking .5mg/day. My detox doc says it makes a lousy pain med. As for morphine pumps, I've been on morphine, but not the continuous infusion, "just" the tablets. I hated morphine's side-effects.

    I don't know if answered your questions; but good luck. --G

  3. #3
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    cory is offline Senior Member
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    Suboxone is very weak as far as opiates are concerned.

    Morphine is very powerful and often abused.

    www.myspace.com/kawi1000

  4. #4
    guinevere64's Avatar
    guinevere64 is offline Senior Member
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    Suboxone is weak in terms of analgesia, but extraordinarily powerful as an opioid binder. Morphine is less powerful than suboxone as a binder, but much more powerful as an analgesic (i.e., it's better at stimulating the receptors). --G

  5. #5
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    MikefrOhio is offline Senior Member
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    I take Suboxone for chronic pain.

    It seems to work best at a very low dose, 1/2mg to 1mg. In the higher dose range it seems to cause harsh rebound pain, at least for me it did.

    I also agree, any opiate can be abused.

    IMO if you have suffered from the disease of addiction, then try everything else you can, before choosing suboxone for pain. IMO if a person is bound to take an opiate for pain, then suboxone would be easier to manage dose wise and mentally than others like vicodin, oxy or the like. But, it is still a narcotic and it brings with it the baggage.

    My doctors have tried many things, from diet, therapy, mixtures of other non-narcotic medications and so on. Some things have helped me progress, diet, supplements and therapy. But, I am still in too much pain, when I have my bad days.

    I would suggest finding a very bright pain specialist who understands addiction and who is willing to think out of the box to help you with a complete lifestyle change which can help the pain issues. That is the direction I am taking.

    If you do take Sub for pain, be very careful. Keep the dose very, very low. Work a good program so you keep your self emotionally and spiritually healthy.

    I wish you the best, it is hard when your dealing with life effecting pain and addiction and I hope you can find answers without needing any type of narcotic.

    Mike

  6. #6
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    Sluggo is offline Senior Member
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    quote:Originally posted by guinevere64

    If what you're asking is, can people get "high" with suboxone, I don't have any experience with that,
    I do have experience with that....and the answer is yes...suboxone can get you high.

  7. #7
    Living Free is offline Senior Member
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    Deb, morphine and sub are NOT the answers to your husband's problems. Both WILL be abused by him because he is an active addict. He needs to recognize it. There is no easy pill or fix for this - as he needs to work on recovery by recognizing he's an addict and getting himself to meetings 2x/day. Any opiate means to help him is not an acceptable solution for an addict. Did he suggest this or was this a question from you??? Just curious.....hope youre doing better Deb. L

    "Everyone Thinks Of Changing The World, But No One Thinks Of Changing Himself" - Leo Tolstoy

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    "The Purpose Of Life Is Spiritual Transformation From A Reactive Being To A Proactive Being" - Yehuda Berg

  8. #8
    Omnicron Theta is offline Senior Member
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    Buprenorphine is a poor analgesic choice for opiate tolerant people, which your husband is (well, ubertolerant). For the opiate naive, it does well at low doses. Long acting and good oral availability.

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    I shot morphine reutinely, it is like Heroin, more so than Oxycontin or anything else I have tried. Pumps deliver the drugs direct to your spinal fluid or bloodstream. Hence I am pretty sure not a viable option for any opiate addict, but what do I know, talk to a doctor..

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    IMO, Suboxone would be a better alternative(than OxyContin) for your husband, but if at all possible, I would exhaust all the (non-opoid)options before trying anything else narcotic. What your husband doesn't want to realize now is that he's missing out on his life because of drugs and if he can find another way to treat his pain, life can be infinitely better, there are those unfortunate people who don't have a choice and need to use some type of narcotic for (chronic pain)therapy, but he has to give sobriety a chance before he can really know whether that's him or not...

    Get up and free yourself from yourself.
    Locked up inside you,
    like the calm beneath castles,
    is a cavern of treasures that
    no-one has been to.
    Let's go digging.
    Bring it out to take you back in. - MJK

  11. #11
    one day at a time is offline Senior Member
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    Hy Deb....I may be biased...i maybe against the pain pumps...why I just had one installed...Last Chance to fill up before the Desert...Rest Rooms around the back...it took me 10 days in hospital and a 28 day trial at home...it was filled with Clondine not Morphine...you have to go back to the hospital every 6 weeks to get a refill or less deppending how much they give you...also the battery is dead after 7 years so you need a new pump (12,000$ no change) Clondine helps things like Tramadol to work even better...well thats the theory...what happened to me was they messed up the eppidural...so I am not only in more pain but I cannot walk further than 7 mins before about 1.1/2 hours steady pace...and who did it ??? No one or so they say..so please think before your getting it done...granted my spine was dammaged before due to neck surgery...but sometimes you think you have found the promissed land...Stand Up Stand up for Jesus...So the Buggers at the back cant see...only to find that someone built a parking lot on it....tread carefully on this path Deb All th Best Jim

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    trust4me is offline Senior Member
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    Hi Everyone,

    Thanks for your posts. Yes, I'm much better this week than I was last week.

    Liny, no, hubby did not suggest sub or a pain pump.....this idea is something I came across while doing a search for pain control. I haven't mentioned these methods of pain control to my husband. Now I know that I won't.

    Now I'm going to explore Medtronic implant devices. Over the weekend, I read an article about Jerry Lewis, and how he had tried EVERYTHING, including narcotic pain relievers, in an effort to control his chronic pain. He claims he now has a Medtronic implant device, and that it takes care of 100% of his pain, and that he now has his life back. Have any of you heard of them?

    Love to y'all,
    Deb

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